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If you are a developer in the web development world, you know that we are in a fast evolving industry. There are tons of new things happening every day. In order to be productive and build great web applications, we need to learn everyday. Attending conferences is one of many great ways to learn. In the conference, I can observe what the current trends are, how people solve problems, and how to make our development lives easier with new tools.

 

Luckily, my company, SolarCity, supports me to attend conferences. Our team went to the 2016 Fluent Conference in San Francisco last week. It was my first time attending a large-scale programming conference, and I really had a great time learning from all sorts of topics there.

 

Below is my learning summary:

The web development world is really energetic. Lots of companies provide frameworks, tools, testing, deployment solutions, trainings, etc. The barrier to start building a web app is becoming lower and lower everyday. 

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Since I started working as software engineer at SolarCity, I’ve been using AngularJS a lot. This article summarizes the useful articles for AngularJS.

 

How to get started (Part 1 of the AngularJS – from beginner to expert in 7 steps series)- Great article to help you learn Angular step by step if you don’t know Angular yet.

http://www.ng-newsletter.com/posts/beginner2expert-how_to_start.html

 

Angular Style Guide: I always mis-match the John Papa’s style guide with Papa John’s Pizza…You might find me saying Papa John’s style guide and John Papa’s Pizza sometimes…Anyhow, John Papa’s Angular Style Guide is definitely the Bible of Angular style guide. If you are new to Angular, please definitely check this for the best practice of Angular.

https://github.com/johnpapa/angular-styleguide
AngularJS performance & production tips: Very organized tips for better Angular App performance.

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Ask not what your industry can do for you–ask what you can do for your industry.

In Hack Reactor week 1, we had a class in which Phillip Alexander taught us about open source contribution. Before we talk about “contribution,” let’s find out what open source is. Wikipedia’s definition: “In production and development, open source as a development model promotes a universal access via a free license to a product’s design or blueprint, and universal redistribution of that design or blueprint, including subsequent improvements to it by anyone.

 

The easiest definition for open source is this: it means anything that is free to use, reproduce, or redesign. We all know the power of crowdsourcing. If there are 10 thousand people reviewing and contributing to a project, we would assume it to have less typos/bugs. Open source contribution’s goal is to make software safer & better.

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