Ask not what your industry can do for you–ask what you can do for your industry.

In Hack Reactor week 1, we had a class in which Phillip Alexander taught us about open source contribution. Before we talk about “contribution,” let’s find out what open source is. Wikipedia’s definition: “In production and development, open source as a development model promotes a universal access via a free license to a product’s design or blueprint, and universal redistribution of that design or blueprint, including subsequent improvements to it by anyone.

 

The easiest definition for open source is this: it means anything that is free to use, reproduce, or redesign. We all know the power of crowdsourcing. If there are 10 thousand people reviewing and contributing to a project, we would assume it to have less typos/bugs. Open source contribution’s goal is to make software safer & better.

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In Hack Reactor week 6 (the final week of our junior life), we started working on our MVP project. It’s our first time in Hack Reactor to work on a project solo. Within 36 hours, we needed to come up with an idea, write our product from scratch, and prepare a demo.

 

My MVP project is called Github Saga, which is a web service that allows you to enter your Github handle and find out your contribution data among your followers and following.

Screen Shot 2015-03-26 at 10.53.45 AM

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In Hack Reactor week 3, we were introduced to Backbone.js. I didn’t fully grasp the concept of Backbone in class, so I would like to practice it and explain my understanding here.

Backbone is an MVC framework that is widely used in Javascript. MVC stands for “Model”, “View”, and “Controller.” The benefit of using MVC is that your code will be cleaner and easier to maintain/expand in the future.

So, first of all, let’s build an HTML page for our To-do app. We need to include jquery, underscore, and backbone library. The app.js is the file we will build for backbone.

Screen Shot 2015-03-13 at 1.57.33 PM

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This past week flew by like an arrow. I just completed Hack Reactor week 1 (wohoo)! There are lots of stuff I learned from this past week. Here is the quick review of what I experienced in week 1.

1. Awesome people: People at Hack Reactor are super cool. From lecturers, staff, to seniors and same cohort peers, everyone is so passionate and caring. The energy in the environment really motivates me to be as awesome as others.

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You know how I researched coding bootcamps and the reason I chose Hack Reactor from here. I applied for four bootcamps in the Bay Area, and this post is about my application experience.

I finalized my application list to these four bootcamps: Hack Reactor, Dev Bootcamp, RocketU, and Coding Dojo. Because Hack Reactor was on the top of my list, I first went through Coding Dojo and RocketU’s applications (to practice and prepare myself).

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Image Source: Hack Reactor

Image Source: Hack Reactor

 

From my previous post, you know I am going to a coding bootcamp called Hack Reactor. However, how do you find a right bootcamp that fits you? Before I applied to any bootcamp, I researched through Google and Quora to find people’s reviews about bootcamps. There are also websites that collect bootcamp information by city, focus, reviews, etc. Here are the websites I know: Bootcamp Finder, Bootcamper, Switch Up, Course Report. Jeff’s blog post, How to Compare Bootcamps, also helped me decide my list of bootcamps to apply.

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I haven’t written any blog post for a while and now it’s 2015 already! I can’t believe time flies so fast!! There are lots of changes I faced in the end of 2014, and in 2015 I will have a totally different lifestyle.

The biggest change is I am going back to school…well sort of. It’s a coding school(bootcamp) called Hack Reactor. In the second half of 2014, I felt I wanted to learn programming in a more systematic way. Therefore, I researched all kinds of possibilities like CS master program, CS undergraduate, online certified classes, Udacity CS master program, etc. The biggest concern I had was the time it will take. Quitting my job to study 2~4 years seems a little terrifying for me. In addition, I want to learn while doing lots of practical projects. Some of the programs seemed as if they would only focus on the theory part.

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